Maximum Education: Pay attention in class

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CASE STUDY #3: Homework Tracking University Level

CASE STUDY #3: Homework Tracking University Level

Matt was a college sophomore who was a pre-med major.  He had challenging classes and was never able to get ahead of the workload.  A part of the challenge at the university level (compared to the high school, middle school, or elementary levels) is that there is a constant flow of work and new information, but far fewer points of evaluation or testing.  Some university classes may have only two graded events: a midterm and a final, or a paper and a final, or maybe even just a paper.  Matt also had an academic history of being able to get by on his wits, and he never really had a system.  Finally in this year, with this course load, he reached the overload point.

“Before, I would just look at the material, and I would get it pretty quickly. I didn’t have to take a lot of notes, and I didn’t spend that much time on the homework.  I just didn’t need to.  But this year, the volume of work has gotten to the point where I just don’t know what to do first.”

The first thing we did was teach Matt to use and to establish daily (even multiple times daily) attention to the homework tracking and time management system that you will also learn in this section of Maximum Education.  Because the university curriculum he had at the time did not have many deadlines, we set up our own deadlines that he was to follow.  We created mock test dates and other artificial events to create deadlines and checkpoints.  After only 3 sessions, Matt had the system down, and he was on his way.

“I actually spend less time studying and getting organized now than I did before putting this system into place, and I feel 10x more in control of the information and the material moving ahead.  It was really just a matter of following along with what I learned and doing it.”

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Maximum Education: Think short and long term

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Maximum Education: Plan your work – Work your Plan

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Maximum Education: Be Organized with your notes

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CASE STUDY #2: Homework Tracking Middle School

CASE STUDY #2: Homework Tracking Middle School

 

“I feel like my daughter is always behind with school.  When we look at her grade report, she is always missing homework assignments, which hurts her grades.  How hard is it to just do the homework and turn it in?”

This is a summary of how my work with Emma began. He mother called me just after the first marking period grades posted for seventh grade.  She was under the impression – based on her daughter’s report at the dinner table – that all was well, and Emma’s grades were fine.  Now that Emma was in middle school, her parents felt that it was time for her to take ownership of her schedule and her work, so they stopped monitoring the homework as they had done in elementary school and sixth grade.

In my first meeting with Emma, she told me that, even though she wrote down the homework and did it, she didn’t always get credit for it.  She was spending about 45 minutes at the most on homework daily, but never on Friday or weekends (“We don’t get any then,” she told me).  When I asked why she wasn’t getting full or even partial credit, she said that sometimes teachers (she had a team of 4 teachers over her curriculum) would collect the homework, and other times, they wouldn’t, and it was just bad luck that the few times she hadn’t done the work were the times it had been collected.  Also, she insisted the teachers hadn’t given her credit for some homework  she had done.  When I asked why, she finally said “Well, I didn’t show all of my work, and that’s what the teacher wanted to see.”  When I asked why she hadn’t shown the work, she just shrugged her shoulders and said she didn’t think it mattered as long as she felt she understood the work.

In this case, our first goal was to establish a system to get the work done and done properly.  The truth was the work she had done (even if incomplete) was good.  It was just lacking a complete job, and she wasn’t doing all the work or handing it in.  So the first thing we had to do was re-establish the mindset that ALL homework is important.  Frankly, whether Emma felt the homework was important or not, the teacher is the one who makes that decision in the classroom, and she needed to treat all the work with equal importance.  She seemed reluctant to do this at first.

“If I get how to do it after 3 practice problems, then why do I have to do 30 problems for homework? That doesn’t make sense to me…”

Once we established the basic ground rules – do all homework; do all homework completely; think long term, not just about what’s going on the next day in class –she was able to slowly, but surely, develop a more productive mindset.  She implemented the tracking and prioritization system.  She started devoting about 25% of her study time to looking to the “L” assignments.  She became more diligent with her day-to-day work.

“I have to admit I still don’t think doing the homework is the most important part of school, but it did upset me that I was getting lower grades because I didn’t do it right. Since I started using the system, I haven’t missed one homework assignment, and I have an A in almost all of my classes.” 

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Maximum Education: Get a system that works for you

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