Archive for category: Test Prep

CASE STUDY #5: High School Outline 

Organizing a term paper can be a daunting process for any high school student.  Amy had to write a 16 to 20 page term paper for history class comparing the rules and regulations of various monarchies of Europe.  “Collecting and researching this information alone was a big process, but organizing it and making it useful was even harder.   I was able to make different outlines for each source while my friends were using little 3×5 cards.  I used a few different outline types but mostly the indent type and the concept maps.”  Amy received a 97 on her term paper and she reported that the actual writing was the easy part because her research and other needed information is so accessible.

CASE STUDY #4:  Middle School Outline

Ryan was a middle school student who I began working with midway through his seventh grade year.  He was having issues organizing – specifically for science because the class involved information that the teacher provided in multiple types of ways such as power points, in worksheets and also in class notes.  He was having trouble integrating all this information into one singular way.  “I took the information and to make a single outline as simply as he could but yet it contained all the main information I needed.  I was also using the outlines to organize teachers the notes and my own notes.”  Ryan used the radial and line style outlines mostly because they were the most useful for this type of information and they were visual.

Summer academic opportunities include:

SAT and ACT preparation.
mAke the grAde addresses all areas of these important tests. There is an SAT on August 26th this year, which is the first time that there has been an SAT (or ACT) during the summer.

Subject review and preview for all areas of Math and Science.
You can review topics like algebra, geometry, pre-calc and calculus, as well as, Biology, Chemistry and Physics if you had challenges with any of these topics this past school year.

If you plan to have any of these topics in the fall, you can preview these topics to get a jump off the rest of the course.

During the summer, Liz and I previewed the first 5 chapters of the upcoming Chemistry class.  Once school began, she has already learned, and she was already comfortable with material covering the entire first quarter and half of the second quarter.  Liz scored a 96% in the first quarter and 95% and second and an A on the midterm!  She also has a lot less stress and was able to spend as much time as she needed on her other courses (which included 2 AP and 2 Honors classes).

Maximum Education Principles
Time management
Information management
A daily action success plan

Maximum Education principles are based on the book, Maximum Education, the Amazon #1 best seller.

For more information… contact mAke the grAde at sgreene@makethegrade.net

 

 

Maximum Education – The Ultimate Guide to Optimal Academics presents three cornerstones to academic (and all) success:

Information management
     Time management
     A daily action plan

Steven-Green-Book-CoverHere is a case study of a high school student, Dan, who I worked with to improve his grades. One of his challenges was that his ‘information management’ was poor and often he did not have a record of what homework he had to do nor when it was due.  Once Dan was taught, and once he consistently applied a system, his grades improved quickly and he actually spent less time on his school work.


CASE STUDY #1: Homework Tracking High School

I began working with Dan, who was a high school sophomore.  He had a typical college prep track load of courses, with a few honors classes as well.  His issue, in part, was keeping track of all the assignments that he had.

At the start, Dan’s “system” was to write down all the homework in the tracking book that the school provided. Good start! He did have a good working record of what he had to do.   But from there, he had no plan at all.  He would start an assignment from math, and half way through it, he would shift and begin working on Spanish.  Then he would move onto chemistry, etc. He was spending about 90 -120 minutes per day on homework.  Once he did get done, he would put all of his completed homework into his done folder (and not into his binder area for that particular class).  Since he had multiple notebooks, he would often have trouble locating the homework promptly when it was time to turn it in or go over it in class.  Dan did not spent anytime working ahead and anticipating longer term assignments, however.  He basically only did what was due the next day.

“Now that I have a system I feel like I am in control of this situation.  Since I am always up to date, the subjects don’t seem as challenging either.  In fact, they seem to be getting easier because I really understand what’s going on.”  – Dan, High School student and Maximum Education user

Dan learned and started to use the Maximum Education system.  He would not move onto an assignment until the present one was complete.  He would file his completed work in the proper areas of his notebooks, by course.  Better still, he incorporated future thinking into his daily study regimen.  Over time, it worked out that he would allocate about 15 minutes per day, per class, to look ahead for future tests, quizzes, papers, and work, so he could get a head start on those as well.   Within a test cycle, or about three weeks of school time, Dan improved his grades in every single course.  Once he got his system in place and became consistent with it, he was spending 60-75 minutes per day on homework and study time… actually LESS than he was prior to implementing the systems… so better grades, less study time and less stress.

For more information about Maximum Education or to get a copy of the book visit www.maximumeducation.net

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3/27/17 – Webinar Replay

SAT or the ACT – which test is right for you?

How to create an optimal SAT or ACT test prep program.

Planning your 2nd semester.

Your short term goals
Your long term goals
Taking action for success

REGISTER FOR THE mAke the grAde WEBINAR

What has a lot of great information about:

  • SAT
  • ACT
  • Math
  • Sciences
  • Study Skills
  • College Admissions
  • Maximum Education Principles

Where can you learn more about the Maximum Education system?

What has a lot of useful take aways which will help you right away?

Where can you get your questions answered in real time?

What is free and easy to access?

Wordress site header

Answer –>  It’s back….

The mAke the grAde weekly webinar!!

Every Monday 9pm east time (8 central, 7 mountain, 6 pacific)

Beginning January 23rd

REGISTER FOR THE mAke the grAde WEBINAR

Join Dr Steven Greene – Lead Education at mAke the grAde and author of the Maximum Education, the Amazon #1 Best Selling Education Guide Book

You will learn:

  • Principles from Maximum Education
  • Time Management Skills
  • Information Management Skills
  • Creating a Daily Action Plan
  • SAT / ACT Test Prep Tips
  • Study Techniques for Midterms / Finals
  • College Admissions Advice
  • Academic Success Tips
  • Current Topics in Education
  • And get answers to your questions with real time Q/ASteven-Green-Book-Cover

This is a free online based webinar but you must pre-register to attend by clicking on the
green link at the bottom of this email.

REGISTER FOR THE mAke the grAde WEBINAR

If you keep doing the same things, you will keep getting the same results.

If you want different results you need to try new things.

2017This is true for everything in life including your academics and your education.  So if you are not 100% pleased with your grades, or your SAT or ACT test scores, or your overall academic standing… you need to actively do something about it… and the sooner the better.  So it’s a new year, and it’s the time for resolutions and fresh starts… so make the changes you need and get going in the right direction.

Here are questions that you need to ask yourself right now…

  • Evaluate your study habitsefficiency-image
    Are you ‘efficient’ with your time?
    Do you always finish projects that you begin?
    Are you prepared for deadlines or are you always cramming?
    Do you understand the material or just ‘get it’?
  • Evaluate your time management
    Do you plan ahead?
    Do you follow plans that you do make or do you ‘freelance’?
    Are you ready to hand in work or take tests when they are scheduled?
    Do you have a calendar that you follow?
  • Evaluate your information management
    How do you track information?
    Are your notes accessible? – Can you find what you need when you need it?
    Are your notes consistent with your learning style – visual? auditory?
    How many different ways do you know how to make an outline?
    Are you using online and offline resources?

Evaluate your daily action plan
inefficiency-imageAre your days productive?
Do you complete all of your work?Most of your work?Some of you work?
Do you plan ahead and begin work on longer term projects?
Are you able to complete all of the work that you need to complete in the allotted time?
Do you plan for the following day each day?

Change has to begin by evaluating where you are and determining where you want to be… and then taking action to reach your goals.

Get Maximum Education –> For study tips, insights and an action plan

GET MAXIMUM EDUCATION NOW

 

#maximumeducation tip- SAT / ACT test prep. The best strategy is a longer term – slow and steady – approach. Don’t cram.

Get you copy here: http://bit.ly/maxedfree

What is your plan? Inbox for a test prep guide and plan.

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Dr Steven Greene of mAke the grAde analysis:

I do not think that this change will have any large impact in the college admissions process.  It seems that all is it doing is just changing a standard for scoring.  The relative score would essentially remain the same.  This change does, however, align the scoring systems of the ACT writing essay to the SAT writing section.

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Misti the Tutoring Cat

May  2016  ACT Will Move to 2-to-12 Score Range for ACT Writing Test Results

IOWA CITY, Iowa—Beginning this fall with the September national test date, ACT will no longer report ACT writing test scores on a 1-to-36 scale. To reduce confusion among users, the writing score will instead be reported on a range of 2-to-12, with 12 being the highest possible score. The new reported score will be the average of the four 2-to-12 domain scores on the essay.

The writing test itself, which was revised last year, will remain unchanged. The essays will still be scored using the same rubric, on four domains (ideas and analysis, development and support, organization, and language use and conventions) by two independent readers. Scores on the four individual domains on the ACT writing test will continue to be reported on a 2-to-12 range as they are now.

Last year, ACT revised the optional writing test and began converting results to a 1-to- 36 score scale to be consistent with the multiple-choice ACT test scores. This change, however, caused confusion among students who attempted to interpret their writing score in comparison to their multiple choice test scores. Each ACT subject test measures different skills, and many students earn higher scores on some tests than on others.

“Our customers have spoken, and we have listened,” said ACT Chief Commercial Officer Suzana Delanghe. “Converting the writing results to a 1-to-36 scale made sense conceptually, but in practice it created confusion among some students. We clearly understand that now, and we are making this change to eliminate the confusion.”

“Our research indicates that scores on the revised ACT writing test are performing no differently in comparison with scores on the other four ACT subject tests than they did on the previous writing test,” said Wayne Camara, ACT senior vice president of research. “Converting the writing scores to the 1-to-36 scale may have made the differences in scores seem larger or more obvious. This is really a perceptual problem that we are addressing.”

ACT advises that students can best interpret how well they scored on an individual subjectACT book test by looking at the percentile rank, rather than comparing the score on one subject test to the score on another.

ACT is a mission-driven, nonprofit organization dedicated to helping people achieve education and workplace success. Headquartered in Iowa City, Iowa, ACT is the nation’s leader in college and career readiness, providing high-quality assessments grounded in more than 50 years of research and experience. ACT offers a uniquely integrated set of solutions that empower individuals with insights to succeed from elementary school through career. To learn more about ACT, go to www.act.org.

Contact: Ed Colby, ACT Public Relations 319.337.1147; ed.colby@act.org

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This article is quoted from http://testprepprofessionals.com/act-to-drop-1-36-scoring-on-the-writing-section/ but the original source is www.act.org